A Beginner's Mind - Maximising potential

No moment is sort of the identical as the other. Everything around us is constantly changing.

And yet most folks, most of the time, see people and situations like they're identical as they were before, through our neurological lens of habitual perception.

Everything changes, but our mind doesn't always follow.

Consider the following points: 

  • Once you meet someone you recognise well, does one see them as they are or as a mirrored image of what you know? 
  • Do you see the person ahead of you as he or she is?

  • Do you see the item or situation because it is? Or does one see a mirrored image of what you're wont to seeing?

  • Similarly, after you are faced with a well-recognised situation, does one see it as a brand new opportunity or because the "same old, same old" supported how it's been before? 
  • In other words, does one see the vivid, present reality or just a set of old memories?

Observe everything with curiosity. As if for the primary time. Seeing everything because it opens our mind to finding the positive potential in everything

Beginner's Mind means to interrupt our usual, neurologically conditioned framework for people and situations, and searching at these items anew. Seeing things as if for the primary time opens our mind to the fresh possibility. It means to determine the positive potential in situations, in others, and in ourselves.

Beginner's Mind is developed through mindfulness training. Be inquisitive about each in-breath, because it's always new. Be interested in each out-breath because it, too, is additionally new. And be inquisitive about each distraction because it too is rarely the identical.

So the Key takeaway is seeing things as if for the primary time opens our mind to the fresh possibility. It means to work out the positive potential in situations, in people, and in ourselves.

And a to do is to develop a Beginner’s Mind, engage your curiosity as you undergo your daily mindfulness training.


Having clear priorities

As a beginner, Once may be working hard but still with lower productivity and success. It's because the work is not going in the right direction.

Take a flash to think about the difference between being active and being productive. you may likely find that being “active” doesn't necessarily equate to being “productive”. for instance, writing plenty of emails could also be very active, but may or might not be very productive. Similarly, spending hours in meetings is certainly activity but might not always be helping you progress closer to achieving your goals.

If we apply the Pareto Principle to figure, many folks find that eighty per cent of our effort is spent on activities that bring us only twenty per cent outcome. And conversely, sometimes we are able to exert only twenty per cent effort and are ready to realise eighty per cent outcome. The art of productivity is therefore to prioritise those activities that bring the most important outcome. And to see those, we must constantly relate our activities to our main goals.

Often times we discover ourselves whirled up within the busyness of way of life. And within the midst of it all, we tend to easily follow the activities in our schedule. It’s rather like we’re smitten by action. But instead of prioritise what's on your schedule, why not schedule your priorities?

This week, take time to make sure you're clear on the activities that may bring you closer to achieving your goals. Notice after you become entrapped by action addiction. make sure to include your priorities into your schedule so you recognise you're working toward the items that have meaning for you.

So the key takeaway is that the art of productivity is to prioritise those activities that bring the largest outcome.

And to do is to require time to confirm you're clear on the activities which will bring you closer to achieving your goals.


References and Further reading:
  1. https://hbr.org/2016/03/learning-to-learn
  2. https://www.nap.edu/read/10129/chapter/8#120

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